Call to Boycott the Oral History Conference at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem: Open Letter | US Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel

Call to Boycott the Oral History Conference at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem: Open Letter | US Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel.

The following open letter was issued on August 12 to oral historians and scholars planning to participate in the June 2014 International Conference on Oral History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. The letter is signed by over 200 scholars and community oral historians and counting; and is endorsed by Academic and Cultural Boycott Campaigns, AURDIP (France), BAB (Germany), BOYCOTT! (Israel), BRICUP (UK), InCACBI (India), PACBI (Palestine), PBAI (Spain), USACBI (USA) and by the Alternative Information Centre (Israel)- and is endorsed by Independent Jewish Voices Canada; University of Toronto SJP (Canada); SJP of UCLA – and by Ronnie Kasrils, former South African government minister, anti-apartheid activist and writer.

 

To add your name to this list of signatories please email: hebrewuconferenceboycott@gmail.com. Download a PDF of the letter.

 

CAMPAIGN TO BOYCOTT THE ORAL HISTORY CONFERENCE AT HEBREW UNIVERSITY OF JERUSALEM

 

hebrewuconferenceboycott@gmail.com

 

August 12, 2013

 

Dear Colleagues:

 

We are a group of Palestinian, Israeli, and other oral historians and academics from Europe, South Africa, and North America calling on you to boycott the June 2014 ‘International Conference on Oral History’ organised by the Oral History Division of the Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. While all Israeli universities are deeply complicit in the occupation, settler-colonialism, and apartheid, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem is particularly noteworthy, as we explain below.

 

Your actions have a direct impact on our joint struggle for a just peace in Palestine-Israel and on our solidarity with fellow Palestinian academics whose universities have been closed down, blockaded and even bombed by Israeli aircraft in the last three decades; universities which have been subjected to a lengthy and brutal Israeli occupation in East Jerusalem, the West Bank, and Gaza.

 

Specifically, the land on which some of its MountScopus campus buildings and facilities were expanded was acquired as a result of Israel’s 1968 illegal confiscation of 3345 dunums of Palestinian land. [1] This confiscated land in East Jerusalem is occupied territory according to international law. Israel’s unilateral annexation of occupied East Jerusalem into the State of Israel, and the application of Israeli domestic law to it, are violations of the Fourth Geneva Convention, and have been repeatedly denounced as null and void by the international community, including by the UN Security Council (Resolution 252, 21 May 1968). Moving Israeli staff and students to work and live on occupied Palestinian land places the HebrewUniversity in grave violation of the Fourth Geneva Conventions.

 

Further, the university is complicit in the unequal treatment of Palestinians, including those who are citizens of Israel. [2] For instance, it does not provide teaching services to the residents of Jerusalem and the surrounding areas in contrast to those provided to Jewish groups; no courses are offered in Arabic. [3] Additionally, the HebrewUniversity has chosen to remain silent when the entire population of Gaza has been excluded from the possibility to enrol and study in the university by the Israeli government. Palestinian students from Gaza have a better chance of getting into a university in the U.S than into HebrewUniversity.

 

The Hebrew University administration restricts the freedom of speech and protest of its few Palestinian students. For example, it had forbidden a commemoration event for the invasion of the Gaza Strip in 2008-2009 in which about 1,400 Palestinians were killed by the Israeli forces. [4] On the other hand, the Hebrew University offered special considerations and benefits to students who participated in that invasion as soldiers.

 

In December 2012 Israel’s Minister of Defence approved recognition of Arie lUniversity in the illegal colony of Ariel as an Israeli university in the Israeli academic system. As a result, staff from the Hebrew University take part in the supervision and promotion committees of students and staff from the colonial university of Ariel; and the (Jewish only) staff takes part in the supervision and in promotion committees for Hebrew University students and staff. The Hebrew University recognizes academic degrees awarded by the Arie lUniversity, which is built on confiscated Palestinian land and surrounded by Palestinian communities, but does not recognize degrees awarded by the nearby Al-Quds University. [5]

 

Ironically, the oral history conference is organised by an institute named after Avraham Harman, President of the Hebrew University from 1968 to 1983. As President of the Hebrew University he was directly responsible for the rebuilding and expansion of the original campus on Mount Scopus built on land illegally confiscated from Palestinians in East Jerusalem.

 

At a time when the international movement to boycott Israeli academic and cultural institutions is gaining ground in response to Israel’s flagrant and persistent infringement of Palestinian human and political rights, we urge scholars and professionals to reflect upon the implications of taking part in a conference at a complicit institution, and to refrain from such participation. The conference is an attempt to improve the image and reputation of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in the West and to cover up for the fact that the university is closely associated with Israeli annexation and ‘Separation/Apartheid Wall’ policies—policies that were strongly condemned on 9 July 2004 by the International Court of Justice in The Hague.[6]

 

Since the hegemonic world powers are actively complicit in enabling and perpetuating Israel’s colonial and oppressive policies, we believe that the only avenue open to achieving justice and upholding international law is sustained work on the part of Palestinian and international civil society to put pressure on Israel and its complicit institutions to end this oppression.

 

Inspired by the successful cultural boycott of apartheid South Africa, and supported by key Palestinian unions and cultural groups, in 2004, the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) issued a call for the academic and cultural boycott of institutions involved in Israel’s system of occupation, colonialism and apartheid. The Palestinian call appealed to the international academic community, among other things, to “refrain from participation in any form of academic and cultural cooperation, collaboration or joint projects with Israeli institutions” [7].

 

Following this, in 2005, an overwhelming majority in Palestinian civil society called for an all-encompassing BDS campaign based on the principles of human rights, justice, freedom and equality [8]. The BDS movement adopts a nonviolent, morally consistent strategy to hold Israel accountable to the same human rights and international law standards as other nations. It is asking the international academic community to heed the boycott call, as it did in the struggle against South African apartheid, until “Israel withdraws from all the lands occupied in 1967, including East Jerusalem; removes all its colonies in those lands; agrees to United Nations resolutions relevant to the restitution of Palestinian refugees rights; and dismantles its system of apartheid” [9].

 

Paralleling the Apartheid era boycott of complicit South African universities, we believe that participation in academic conferences or similar events in Israel – regardless of intentions- can only contribute to the prolongation of this injustice by normalizing and thereby legitimizing it. It inadvertently contributes to Israel’s efforts to appear as a normal participant in the world of scholarship while at the same time it practices the most pernicious form of colonial control and legalized racial discrimination against Palestinians.

 

Until Israel fully complies with international laws and conventions, we sincerely hope that international academics will not participate in endorsing their violations and the basic human rights of Palestinians – even if inadvertently. We call on our colleagues to treat Israel exactly the same way that most of the world treated racist South Africa – or indeed any other state that legislates and practices apartheid: as a pariah state. Only then can Palestinians hope for a just peace based on international law, respect for human rights, and, more crucially, on the fundamental principle of equality for all, irrespective of ethnicity, religion or other identity considerations.

 

We, therefore, urge you to boycott the Hebrew University of Jerusalem oral history conference and to call on your colleagues to refuse to participate in it; to refuse to cross the Palestinian picket line.

 

[Note: All footnotes are at the end of the document following a note on academic freedom.]

 

Sincerely,

 

  1. Professor Ahmed Abbes, Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, Bures-sur-Yvette, France
  2. Professor  Saleh Abdel Jawad (Hamayel), Birzeit University, Palestine
  3. Professor Nadia Abu el Haj, Barnard/Columbia University, USA
  4. Professor Lila Abu-Lughod, Columbia University, New York, USA
  5. Professor Ghada Ageel, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
  6. Professor Mumtaz Ahmad, Vice President (Academic Affairs), International Islamic University, Islamabad, Pakistan
  7. Professor Ammiel Alcalay, QueensCollege, City of New York, USA
  8. Professor (emeritus) Mateo Alaluf, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium
  9. Dr. Diana Allan, Society for the Humanities, CornellUniversity, Ithaca, USA
  10. Professor Lori Allen, University of Cambridge, England
  11. Professor Amjad Barham, Hebron University, President of the Palestinian Federation of Unions of University Professors and Employees, Palestine
  12. Ryvka Barnard, Doctoral student, New York University, USA
  13. Dr. Samia al-Botmeh, Birzeit University, Palestine
  14. Professor Oren Ben-Dor, Southampton University, England
  15. Professor Hagit Borer, Queen Mary, University of London, England
  16. Professor Glenn Bowan, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK
  17. Dr Robert Boyce, LondonSchool of Economics and Political Science, London University, UK
  18. Professor Haim Bresheeth, SOAS, University of London, England
  19. Professor Judith Butler, University of California, Berkeley, USA
  20. Professor Iain Chambers, Università degli Studi di Napoli, “L’Orientale,” Italy
  21. Professor  Michael Chanan, University of Roehampton, England
  22. Professor Hamid Dabashi, Columbia University, New York, USA
  23. Professor Lawrence Davidson, West Chester University, USA
  24. Professor (emerita) Sonia  Dayan-Herzbrun,  Université Paris, France
  25. Professor Ann Douglas, Columbia University, New York, USA
  26. Professor Haidar Eid, Al-Aqsa University, Gaza, Palestine
  27. Professor Nada Elia, Antioch University-Seattle, Washington, USA
  28. Professor Randa Farah, University of Western Ontario, Canada
  29. Professor (emeritus), Emmanuel Farjoun, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem,  Israel
  30. Arie Finkelstein, student, Université  Paris Est, France
  31. Professor Ellen Fleischmann, University of Dayton, Ohio, USA
  32. Senior Scholar Bill Fletcher, Jr., Institute for Policy Studies; former President, TransAfrica Forum, Washington, DC, USA
  33. Professor Cynthia Franklin, University of Hawaiʻi
  34. Professor Candace Fujikane, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Honolulu
  35. Ana Ghoreishian, PhD student, University of Arizona, USA
  36. Dr Terri Ginsberg, ICMES, New York, USA
  37. Professor (emerita) Sherna Berger Gluck, CaliforniaStateUniversity, Long Beach, USA
  38. Professor (emeritus)  Yerach Gover, City University of New York, USA
  39. Professor Michel Gros,  CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research,  Rennes, France
  40. Professor (emerita) Sondra Hale, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
  41. Emad Hamdeh, PhD student, Exeter University, UK
  42. Professor Carrie Hamilton, University of Roehampton, UK
  43. Professor Michael Harris, Université  Paris-Diderot, France
  44. Professor Salah D. Hassan, MichiganStateUniversity, Lansing, USB
  45. Professor Sami Hermez, University of Pittsburgh, USA
  46. Shir Hever, Independent Economist/Researcher, Palestine-Israel
  47. Dr. Colleen Jankovic, US Film Scholar, Al-qaws organization, AlQuds/Jerusalem, Palestine
  48. Tineke E. Jansen, Independent researcher, former IOHA Council member, England
  49. Professor Rhoda Kanaaneh, Columbia University, New York, USA
  50. Dr. Fatma Kassem, Independent researcher, Israel
  51. Professor Robin D. Kelley, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
  52. Professor Tarif Khalidi, Center for Arab & Middle Eastern Studies, AmericanUniversity, BeirutLebanon
  53. Dr Laleh Khalili, Reader in Politics, SOAS, University of London, England
  54. Professor David Klein, California State University, Northridge, USA
  55. Professor Dennis Kortheuer, California State University, Long Beach
  56. Professor Ronit Lentin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
  57. Dr Les Levidow, Open University, UK
  58. Professor David Colles Lloyd, University of California, Riverside
  59. Professor (emeritus) Moshé Machover, Kings College, University of London, England
  60. Professor Nur Masalha, SOAS, University of London, England
  61. Professor Joseph Massad, Columbia University, New York, USA
  62. Professor Dina Mattar, SOAS, University of London, England
  63. Professor Anne Meneley, Trent University, Canada
  64. Professor William Messing, University of Minnesota, USA
  65. Jennifer Mogannam, Ph. D. candidate, University of California, San Diego
  66. Professor  Chandra Talpade Mohanty, Syracuse University, New York, USA
  67. Professor Ahlam Muhtaseb, California State University, San Bernardino, USA
  68.  Dr Karma Nabulsi, University of Oxford, UK
  69. Professor Premilla Nadasen, Queens College, City of New York, USA
  70. Dr. Dorothy Naor, Independent researcher, Israel
  71. Dr. Marcy Newman, Independent Scholar, India
  72. Dr Sonia Nimr, Birzeit University, Palestine
  73. Professor Isis Nusair, Denison University, Ohio, USA
  74. Professor Gary Y. Okihiro, Columbia University, New York, USA
  75. Professor Hussein Omar, University of Oxford, UK
  76. Professor Imranali Panjwani, Kings College, University of London, UK
  77. Professor Ilan Pappe, Exeter University, England
  78. Professor Willie Van Peer, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany
  79. Professor Gabriel Piterberg, UCLA, USA
  80. Professor (emerita) Hilary Rose, University of Bradford & Gresham College, London, UK
  81. Professor (emeritus_ Steven Rose, Open University & Gresham College, London, UK
  82. Professor Jonathan Rosenhead, London School of Economics, University of London, UK
  83. Dr Rosemary Sayigh, Center for Arab and Middle East Studies Centre, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
  84. Professor (emeritus) Pierre Schapira, University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
  85. Professor Sarah Schulman, ACT UP Oral History Project, New York, USA
  86. Professor (Emerita) Evalyn F. Segal, PhD, San Diego State University, USA
  87. Professor May Seikaly, Wayne State University, Detroit, USA
  88. Professor Sherene Seikaly, American University in Cairo, Egypt
  89. Dr. Magid Shihade, Birzeit University, Palestine
  90. Professor Anton Shammas, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA
  91. Professor Andor Skotnes, Chair, Department of History and Society, The SageColleges, Troy, NY, USA
  92. Dr Kobi Snitz, Weizmann Institute, Israel
  93. Professor Ghada Talhami, Lake Forest College, Illinois, USA
  94. Professor Lisa Taraki, BirzeitUniversity, Palestine
  95. Sibel Taylor, PhD candidate, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, England
  96. Professor Sunera Thobani, University of British Columbia, Canada
  97. Professor Barry Trachtenberg, University of Albany, New York, USA
  98. Professor Salim Vally, University of Johannesburg, South Africa
  99. Professor Mark R. Westmoreland, American University Cairo, Egypt
  100. Dr. Patrick Wolfe, Trobe University, Australia
  101. Dr Hala Yameni, Bethlehem University, Bethlehem, Palestine
  102. Professor Mahmoud Zeidan, University of Cairo, Egypt

 

Endorsed by the following Academic and Cultural Boycott Campaigns: AURDIP (France); BOYCOTT! (Israel); BRICUP (UK); InCACBI (India); PACBI (Palestine); USACBI (USA); and by the Alternative Information Centre (Israel).

 

To add your name to this list of signatories please email: hebrewuconferenceboycott@gmail.com

 

THE NECESSARY AND IMPORTANT CONSIDERATION OF ACADEMIC FREEDOM

 

The UN Committee on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights defines academic freedom to include:

 

the liberty of individuals to express freely opinions about the institution or system in which they work, to fulfill their functions without discrimination or fear of repression by the state or any other actor, to participate in professional or representative academic bodies, and to enjoy all the internationally recognized human rights applicable to other individuals in the same jurisdiction. The enjoyment of academic freedom carries with it obligations, such as the duty to respect the academic freedom of others, to ensure the fair discussion of contrary views, and to treat all without discrimination on any of the prohibited grounds. [10], emphasis added]

 

Keeping this definition in mind, we are keenly aware of the importance of the academic freedom of the individual, but also believe that such freedoms should not extend automatically to institutions. Judith Butler reminds us that: “our struggles for academic freedom must work in concert with the opposition to state violence, ideological surveillance, and the systematic devastation of everyday life.” [11]

 

It is incumbent on academics to develop such a nuanced understanding of academic freedom if we are to call for social justice and work alongside the oppressed in advancing their freedom, equality and self-determination.

 

The Israeli academy is not the bastion of dissent and liberalism it is purported to be by those who defend Israel and attempt to delegitimize the call for academic boycott.  The vast majority of the Israeli academic community is oblivious to the oppression of the Palestinian people–both inside Israel and in the occupied territory–and has never opposed the practices and policies of their state. In fact, they duly serve in the reserve forces of the occupation army and, accordingly are likely to be either perpetrators of or silent witnesses to the daily brutality of the occupation.  They also do not hesitate to partner in their academic research with the security-military establishment that is the chief architect and executor of the occupation.  A petition drafted by four Israeli academics merely calling on the Israeli government “to allow [Palestinian] students and lecturers free access to all the campuses in the [occupied] Territories, and to allow lecturers and students who hold foreign passports to teach and study without being threatened with withdrawal of residence visas,” was endorsed by only 407 out of 9,000 Israeli academics – less than 5% of those who were invited to sign it. [12]

 

Notes:

 

[1] The decision was published in the official Israeli Gazette (the Hebrew edition), number 1425. It was therefore “legalized” by Israel. This land, for the most part, was (still is) privately owned by Palestinians living in that area. A large part of the confiscated land was then given to the HebrewUniversity to expand its campus (mainly its dormitories). The Palestinian landowners refused to leave their lands and homes arguing that the confiscation order of 1968 was illegal. When the case was taken to the Jerusalem District Court in 1972 (file no. 1531/72), the court ruled in favor of the University and the state, deciding that the Palestinian families must evacuate their homes and be offered alternative housing. See also http://news.nationalpost.com/2012/02/12/un-report-accuses-israel-of-pushing-palestinians-from-jerusalem-west-bank/

 

[2] Keller, U. (2009) the Academic Boycott of Israel and the Complicity of Israeli Academic Institutions in Occupation of

 

PalestinianTerritories. The Economy of the Occupation: A Socioeconomic Bulletin: Alternative Information Centre.

 

http://www.alternativenews.org/images/stories/downloads/Economy_of_the_occupation_23-24.pdf

 

[3] http://www.jpost.com/Local-Israel/In-Jerusalem/Hebrew-University-in-Arabic

 

[4] http://www.ynet.co.il/articles/0,7340,L-3827102,00.html

 

[5] http://www.jewishlinkbc.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=944:lapid-threatens-to-bring-down-the-govt-on-haredi-army-issue&catid=150:news&Itemid=562

 

[6] http://www.icj-cij.org/docket/index.php?pr=71&code=mwp&p1=3&p2=4&p3=6&ca

 

[7] http://pacbi.org/etemplate.php?id=869

 

[8] http://bdsmovement.net/?q=node/52

 

[9] http://www.pacbi.org/etemplate.php?id=2102

 

[10] UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, “The Right to Education (Art.13),” December 8, 1999

 

http://www.unhchr.ch/tbs/doc.nsf/(Symbol)/ae1a0b126d068e868025683c003c8b3b?Opendocument

 

[11] Judith Butler. “Israel/Palestine and the Paradoxes of Academic Freedom.” in: Radical Philosophy, Vol. 135. pp. 8-17, January/February 2006. http://www.egs.edu/faculty/judith-butler/articles/israel-palestine-paradoxes-of-academic-freedom/ (Accessed on December 10, 2011)

 

[12] http://pacbi.org/etemplate.php?id=792

 

Lettera aperta per boicottare la conferenza di Storia Orale presso l’Università Ebraica di Gerusalemme

La seguente lettera aperta è stata diffusa il 12 agosto per gli storici e studiosi che intendono partecipare alla Conferenza Internazionale di Storia Orale prevista per giugno2014 presso l’Università Ebraica di Gerusalemme.

 

 

La lettera è firmata da 76 studiosi, e sottoscritta da organismi che si occupano di campagne di boicottaggio accademico e culturali: AURPID (Francia); BOYCOTT!! (Israele); BRICUP (UK); InCACBI (India); PACBI (Palestina); USACBI (USA), e dal Centro di Informazione Alternativa (Israele). Per aggiungere il proprio nome a questo elenco dei firmatari si prega di mandare una mail al seguente indirizzo: hebrewUboycott@gmail.com.

 

CAMPAGNA PER IL BOICOTTAGGIO DELLA CONFERENZA DI STORIA ORALE
PRESSO L’UNIVERSITA’ EBRAICA DI GERUSALEMME

 

12 Agosto 2013

 

Cari Colleghi,

 

siamo un gruppo di storici orali ed accademici palestinesi e israeliani ed altri provenienti da Europa, Sud Africa e Nord America; vi invitiamo a boicottare la Conferenza Internazionale di Storia Orale che si terrà nel giugno 2014, organizzata dal Dipartimento di Storia Orale dell’ Avraham Harman Institute of Contemporary Jewry, l’Università Ebraica di Gerusalemme. Mentre tutte le università israeliane sono complici dell’occupazione, del colonialismo e dell’apartheid, il caso dell’Università di Gerusalemme è particolarmente degno di nota, come spieghiamo di seguito.

 

Le vostre azioni hanno un impatto diretto sulla nostra comune lotta per raggiungere una giusta pace tra Palestina e Israele e sulla nostra solidarietà con i colleghi universitari palestinesi, le cui università sono state chiuse, bloccate, perfino bombardate dagli aerei Israeliani negli ultimi tre decenni, università che sono state sottoposte ad una occupazione lunga e brutale da parte di Israele sia a Gerusalemme, sia in Cisgiordania e a Gaza.

 

In particolare, il terreno su cui sono stati costruiti alcuni degli edifici e delle strutture del campus universitario di Mount Scopus, furono acquisiti da Israele nel 1968 a seguito della confisca illegale di circa 3345 dunum di terra palestinese. Questi terreni confiscati si trovano a Gerusalemme Est, che è territorio occupato secondo il diritto internazionale. L’annessione israeliana unilaterale di Gerusalemme Est nel territorio dello stato di Israele, e l’applicazione del diritto nazionale israeliano ad essa, sono violazioni della Quarta Convenzione di Ginevra, che sono state stato più volte dichiarate come nulle e non valide da parte della comunità internazionale, anche da parte del Consiglio di Sicurezza delle Nazioni Unite (risoluzione 252 del 21 maggio 1968). Il dislocamento di personale e studenti israeliani allo scopo di lavorare e vivere sulle terre palestinesi occupate pone l’Università Ebraica in aperta violazione della Quarta Convenzione di Ginevra.

 

Inoltre, l’Università è complice della disparità di trattamento degli studenti Palestinesi, inclusi quelli che sono cittadini di Israele. Ad esempio, non fornisce gli stessi servizi di istruzione per i residenti di Gerusalemme e delle aree limitrofe, contrariamente a quanto previsto per gli studenti ebrei. Non vengono erogati corsi in Arabo. Inoltre,l’università ebraica ha scelto di rimanere in silenzio quando il governo israeliano ha escluso l’intera popolazione di Gaza dalla possibilità di iscriversi e studiare all’università. Gli studenti palestinesi di Gaza hanno migliori possibilità di accedere ad una università statunitense che all’università ebraica.

 

L’amministrazione dell’Università ebraica limita la libertà di parola e di manifestazione dei suoi pochi studenti palestinesi. Per esempio, ha proibito un evento per celebrare la commemorazione per l’invasione della Striscia di Gaza nel 2008-2009 in cui circa 1.400 palestinesi sono stati uccisi dalle forze israeliane. Per contro, l’Università Ebraica ha mostrato una particolare considerazione e ha offerto particolari vantaggi agli studenti che hanno partecipato a tale invasione come soldati.

 

 

Nel dicembre 2012 il Ministero della Difesa israeliano ha approvato il riconoscimento della Arie University, costruita nella colonia illegale di Ariel, come università inserita nel sistema scolastico israeliano. Di conseguenza, il personale dell’Università Ebraica prende parte ai comitati di vigilanza e di promozione degli studenti e del personale presso l’Università coloniale di Ariel, e viceversa . L’Università ebraica riconosce titoli accademici rilasciati dalle Arie University, che è costruita su terra palestinese confiscata e circondata da comunità palestinesi, ma non riconosce i titoli rilasciati dalla vicina Al-Quds University.

 

Per ironia della sorte, la conferenza di storia orale è organizzata da un istituto che prende il nome da Avraham Harman, che fu Presidente dell’Università Ebraica dal 1968 al 1983. Come Presidente dell’università ebraica egli quindi è stato direttamente responsabile della costruzione e dell’ampliamento del campus sul Monte Scopus, costruito su terreni confiscati illegalmente ai palestinesi di Gerusalemme est.

 

Nel momento in cui il movimento internazionale di boicottaggio delle istituzioni accademiche e culturali israeliane sta guadagnando terreno in risposta alla violazione flagrante e persistente dei diritti umani e politici palestinesi da parte di Israele, invitiamo gli studiosi e i professionisti a riflettere sulle implicazioni insite nella partecipazione ad una conferenza organizzata da una istituzione complice di tali violazioni, e li invitiamo ad astenersi da tale partecipazione. Il convegno è un tentativo di migliorare l’immagine e la reputazione dell’università ebraica di Gerusalemme presso l’Occidente e di coprire il fatto che l’università è strettamente connessa con le politiche israeliane di annessione e separazione tramite il Muro dell’Apartheid – politiche che sono state fortemente condannate il 9 luglio 2004 dalla Corte internazionale di giustizia dell’Aia

 

Dal momento che le potenze mondiali egemoni, sono attivamente complici nel permettere e nel perpetuare le politiche coloniali e oppressive di Israele, noi crediamo che l’unica strada possibile per realizzare la giustizia e la difesa del diritto internazionale sia una azione intensa e prolungata da parte della società civile palestinese e internazionale per fare pressione su Israele e le sue istituzioni complici, allo scopo di porre fine a questa oppressione.

 

Ispirata dal successo del boicottaggio culturale contro l’apartheid in Sud Africa, e sostenuta dai sindacati e dei gruppi culturali palestinesi, nel 2004, la Campagna palestinese per il boicottaggio accademico e culturale di Israele (PACBI) ha lanciato un appello per il boicottaggio accademico e culturale delle istituzioni coinvolte nel sistema israeliano di occupazione colonialismo e apartheid. L’appello palestinese alla comunità accademica internazionale chiedeva, tra le altre cose, di “astenersi dalla partecipazione ad ogni forma di cooperazione accademica e culturale, di collaborazione o di partecipazione a progetti congiunti con le istituzioni israeliane”.

 

A seguito di ciò, nel 2005, la stragrande maggioranza della società civile palestinese, lanciò una campagna di boicottaggio universale basato sui principi dei diritti umani, la giustizia, la libertà e l’uguaglianza . Il movimento BDS adotta una strategia non violenta, moralmente coerente nel ritenere Israele responsabile per i diritti umani e verso le norme di diritto internazionale al pari delle altre nazioni. Si chiede alla comunità accademica internazionale di rispondere alla campagna di boicottaggio, come è stato fatto per la lotta contro l’apartheid in Sudafrica, fino a quando “Israele non si ritirerà da tutti i territori occupati nel 1967, compresa Gerusalemme Est; rimuoverà tutte le sue colonie in quelle terre, si impegnerà a rispettare le risoluzioni delle Nazioni Unite relative alla restituzione dei diritti ai rifugiati palestinesi, e smantellerà il suo sistema di apartheid “

 

Parallelamente a quanto avvenuto all’epoca del boicottaggio delle università sudafricane complici dell’apartheid, crediamo che la partecipazione a conferenze accademiche o eventi simili in Israele – a prescindere delle intenzioni, possa solo contribuire al prolungamento di questa ingiustizia normalizzandola e legittimandola. Essa contribuisce involontariamente agli sforzi di Israele per apparire un normale partecipante del mondo delle borse di studio, mentre nel contempo pratica la forma più dannosa di controllo coloniale e legalizza la discriminazione razziale contro i palestinesi.

 

Fino a quando Israele non rispetterà appieno le leggi e le convenzioni internazionali, ci auguriamo vivamente che gli accademici internazionali non parteciperanno avallando così le violazioni dei diritti umani fondamentali dei palestinesi – anche se involontariamente. Invitiamo i nostri colleghi a trattare Israele esattamente nello stesso modo in cui la maggior parte del mondo considerò razzista il Sud Africa – o qualsiasi altro stato che legiferi e pratichi l’apartheid: come uno stato paria. Solo allora i palestinesi potranno sperare in una pace giusta basata sul diritto internazionale, il rispetto dei diritti umani, e, ancora più importante, sul principio fondamentale di uguaglianza per tutti, indipendentemente dall’appartenenza etnica, la religione o altre questioni di identità.

 

Pertanto, vi esortiamo a boicottare la conferenza di storia orale del l’Università Ebraica di Gerusalemme e ad invitare i vostri colleghi a rifiutarsi sia di partecipare sia di attraversare la linea di picchetto palestinese.

 

Sinceramente,

 

1. Professor Ahmed Abbes, Directeur de Recherche au CNRS, Bures-sur-Yvette, France
2. Professor  Saleh Abdel Jawad (Hamayel), Birzeit University, Palestine
3. Dr. Adnan Abdelrazek – The Arab Studies Society – Jerusalem, Palestine
4. Dr. Faiha Abdulhadi, Independent researcher, writer, poet, Palestine
5. Professor Nadia Abu el Haj, Barnard/Columbia University, USA
6. Professor Lila Abu-Lughod, Columbia University, New York, USA
7. Dr. Salman Abu Sitta, Researcher, UK
8. Professor Ghada Ageel, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada
9. Professor Mumtaz Ahmad, Vice President (Academic Affairs), International Islamic University, Islamabad, Pakistan
10. Professor Bayan Nuwayhed al-Hout, Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon
11. Majeda Al-Saqqa, Culture and Free Thought Association, Khan Younis, Gaza, Palestine
12. Professor (emeritus) Mateo Alaluf, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium
13. Professor Ammiel Alcalay, Queens College, City of New York, USA
14. Dr. Diana Allan, Society for the Humanities, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA
15. Professor Lori Allen, University of Cambridge, England
16. Professor Nina Allen, Suffolk University, Boston, USA
17. Professor (retired) William Ayers, University of Illinois-Chicago; Cyprus Oral History Project, USA
18. Professor Alice Bach (retired) Archbishop Hallinan Professor of Religious Studies
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH, USA
19. Gustavo Barbosa, PhD candidate, London School of Economics, UK
20. Professor Amjad Barham, Hebron University, President of the Palestinian Federation of Unions of University Professors and Employees, Palestine
21. Ryvka Barnard, Doctoral student, New York University, USA
22. Professor Oren Ben-Dor, Southampton University, England
23. Julie Benedetto, student, Institut d’Etudes Politiques, Lyon, France
24. David Beorlegui, PhD candidate,  Basque Country University, Spain
25. Dr. Susan Blackwell, Independant language consultant, Birmingham UK
26. Professor Hagit Borer, Queen Mary, University of London, England
27. Professor (emerita) Joanna Bornat , Open University, UK
28. Dr. Samia Botmeh, Birzeit University, Palestine
29. Professor Glenn Bowan, University of Kent, Canterbury, UK
30. Dr. Robert Boyce, London School of Economics and Political Science, London University, UK
31. Professor Haim Bresheeth, SOAS, University of London, England
32. Professor (emeritus) Jacques Bude, Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgium
33. Professor Judith Butler, University of California, Berkeley, USA
34. Professor Iain Chambers, Università degli Studi di Napoli, “L’Orientale,” Italy
35. Professor  Michael Chanan, University of Roehampton, England
36. Professor Elise Chenier, Simon Fraser University, British Columbia, Canada
37. Nikoletta Christodoulou, Frederick University, Nicosia; Cyprus Oral History Project, Cyprus
38. Professor (retired) Raymonde Cloutier, University of Quebec (UQAM), Montreal,  Canada
39. Dr. Jane Collings, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
40. Susan Currie, PhD student, Central Queensland University, Australia
41. Professor Hamid Dabashi, Columbia University, New York, USA
42. Professor Nabil Dajani,  American University of Beirut, Lebanon
43. Professor (emeritus) Eric David, Université libre de Bruxelles, Belgium
44. Professor Lawrence Davidson, West Chester University, USA
45. Dr. Uri Davis, AL-QUDS University, Jerusalem, Palestine
46. Professor (emerita) Sonia  Dayan-Herzbrun,  Université Paris, France
47. Professor Anne-Marie Dillens, University Saint-Louis, Brussels, Belgium
48. Professor Ann Douglas, Columbia University, New York, USA
49. Professor Haidar Eid, Al-Aqsa University, Gaza, Palestine
50. Oroub El-Abed, Senior Teaching Fellow SOAS, London University, UK
51. Professor Nada Elia, Antioch University-Seattle, Washington, USA
52. Professor Randa Farah, University of Western Ontario, Canada
53. Professor (emeritus), Emmanuel Farjoun, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem,  Israel
54. Arie Finkelstein, student, Université  Paris Est, France
55. Professor Ellen Fleischmann, University of Dayton, Ohio, USA
56. Senior Scholar Bill Fletcher, Jr., Institute for Policy Studies; former President, TransAfrica Forum, Washington, DC, USA
57. Dr. Naomi Foyle, Coordinator of British Writers In Support of Palestine, UK
58. Professor Cynthia Franklin, University of Hawaiʻi
59. Professor Candace Fujikane, University of Hawai’i at Mānoa, Honolulu
60. Professeur des Ecoles (en retraite) Marie Gérôme,  Ecole de Viuz,  Faverges, France
61. Ana Ghoreishian, PhD student, University of Arizona, USA
62. Dr. Terri Ginsberg, ICMES, New York, USA
63. Professor (emerita) Sherna Berger Gluck, California State University, Long Beach, USA
64. Professor Heather Goodall, University of Technology Sydney, Australia
65. Professor (emeritus)  Yerach Gover, City University of New York, USA
66. Professor Michel Gros,  CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research,  Rennes, France
67. Professor Regina Beatriz Guimarães Neto. Universidade Federal de Pernambuco; 2006-2008 President Brazilian Oral History Association, 2008-2010/Brazil
68. Professor (emerita) Sondra Hale, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
69. Emad Hamdeh, PhD student, Exeter University, UK
70. Professor Carrie Hamilton, University of Roehampton, UK
71. Professor Sari Hanafi, American University of Beirut, Lebanon
72. Professor Michael Harris, Université  Paris-Diderot, France
73. Professor Salah D. Hassan, Michigan State University, Lansing, USA
74. Professor Sami Hermez, University of Pittsburgh, USA
75. Shir Hever, Independent Economist/Researcher, Palestine-Israel
76. Professor (emeritus) Nicholas Hopkins, American University-Cairo, Egypt
77. Perla Issa, PhD candidate, Exeter University, United Kingdom
78. Hazem Jamjoum, PhD student, New York University, USA/Palestine
79. Dr. Colleen Jankovic, US Film Scholar, Al-qaws organization, AlQuds/Jerusalem, Palestine
80. Tineke E. Jansen, Independent researcher, former IOHA Council member, England
81. Professor Rhoda Kanaaneh, Columbia University, New York, USA
82. Professor, J. Kehaulani Kauanui, Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut, USA
83. Dr. Fatma Kassem, Independent researcher, Israel
84. Professor Robin D. Kelley, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
85. Professor Tarif Khalidi, Center for Arab & Middle Eastern Studies, American University, Beirut Lebanon
86. Dr. Laleh Khalili, Reader in Politics, SOAS, University of London, England
87. Dr. Agnes Kho, Visiting Research Fellow, University of Leeds, UK
88. Professor David Klein, California State University, Northridge, USA
89. Dr. Dennis Kortheuer, California State University, Long Beach
90. Professor Ronit Lentin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland
91. Dr. Les Levidow, Open University, UK
92. Professor David Colles Lloyd, University of California, Riverside
93. Professor (emeritus) Moshé Machover, Kings College, University of London, England
94. Professor Nur Masalha, SOAS, University of London, England
95. Professor Joseph Massad, Columbia University, New York, USA
96. Professor Dina Mattar, SOAS, University of London, England
97. Dr. Willem Meijs, independent language consultant, Birmingham, UK
98. Professor Anne Meneley, Trent University, Canada
99. Professor William Messing, University of Minnesota, USA
100. Jennifer Mogannam, Ph. D. candidate, University of California, San Diego
101. Professor  ChanDr.a Talpade Mohanty, Syracuse University, New York, USA
102. Professor Antonio Montenegro, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil
103. Professor Ahlam Muhtaseb, California State University, San Bernardino, USA
104. Professor (emerita) Martha Mundy, London School of Economics, UK
105. Dr. Karma Nabulsi, University of Oxford, UK
106. Professor Premilla Nadasen, Queens College, City of New York, USA
107. Dr. Dorothy Naor, Independent researcher, Israel
108. Dr. Marcy Newman, Independent Scholar, India
109. Dr. Sonia Nimr, Birzeit University, Palestine
110. Professor Isis Nusair, Denison University, Ohio, USA
111. Professor Gary Y. Okihiro, Columbia University, New York, USA
112. Professor Hussein Omar, University of Oxford, UK
113. Professor Imranali Panjwani, Kings College, University of London, UK
114. Professor Ilan Pappe, Exeter University, England
115. Professor Paul Parker, Baltzer Distinguished Professor of Religion,  Elmhurst College, USA
116. Professor Willie Van Peer, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany
117. Dr. Ana Pego, Business and Economic Studies Department, Open University, Lisbon, Portugal
118. Professor Gabriel Piterberg, University of California, Los Angeles, USA
119. Jorge Ramos Tolosa, researcher and professor, Universitat de València, Spain
120. Professor Marwan Rashed, Université de Paris-IV Sorbonne, Paris
121. Professor (emerita) Hilary Rose, University of Bradford & Gresham College, London, UK
122. Professor (emeritus_ Steven Rose, Open University & Gresham College, London, UK
123. Professor Jonathan Rosenhead, London School of Economics, University of London, UK
124. Professor Hanan Sabea, American University-Cairo, Egypt
125. Ann Sado, Independent lecturer, former Board member, Japan Oral History Association, Tokyo
126. Dr. Rosemary Sayigh, Center for Arab and Middle East Studies Centre, American University of Beirut, Beirut, Lebanon
127. Professor (emeritus) Pierre Schapira, University Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France
128. Dr. Leonardo Schiocchet, Guest Researcher at the Institute for Social Anthropology at the Austrian Academy of Sciences,  Post-doctoral grantee CAPES, Brazil
129. Professor Sarah Schulman, ACT UP Oral History Project, New York, USA
130. Professor (Emerita) Evalyn F. Segal, PhD, San Diego State University, USA
131. Professor May Seikaly, Wayne State University, Detroit, USA
132. Professor Sherene Seikaly, American University in Cairo, Egypt
133. Professor Jihane Sfeir, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium
134. Dorothy Sheridan, Honorary Professor of History (retired), University of Sussex , UK.
135. Dr. Magid Shihade, Birzeit University, Palestine
136. Professor Anton Shammas, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA
137. Professor Andor Skotnes, Chair, Dept. of History and Society, The Sage Colleges, Troy, NY, USA
138. Dr. Kobi Snitz, Weizmann Institute, Israel
139. Dr. Jane Starfield, University of Johannesburg, South Africa
140. Dr. Ziad Suidan, Independent scholar, USA
141. Rabah Tahraoui ,Professeur ,Université de Rouen, France
142. Professor Ghada Talhami, Lake Forest College, Illinois, USA
143. Professor Lisa Taraki, Birzeit University, Palestine
144. Sibel Taylor, PhD candidate, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, England
145. Professor Sunera Thobani, University of British Columbia, Canada
146. Professor Barry Trachtenberg, University of Albany, New York, USA
147. Professor Salim Vally, University of Johannesburg, South Africa
148. Naomi Wallace, Independent scholar, award-winning playwright, UK/USA
149. Professor Mark R. Westmoreland, American University Cairo, Egypt
150. Dr. Patrick Wolfe, Trobe University, Australia
151. Dr. Hala Yameni, Bethlehem University, Bethlehem, Palestine
152. Professor (emeritus) Elia Zureik, Queen’s University, Canada

 

[Note: Tutti i riferimenti sono riportati nell’articolo originale]
Fonte: PACBI
Traduzione a cura di PalestinaRossa

 

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